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The two sides of university initiations were evident at U of T as the fall term began this year. The engineers, traditionally given to pranks, shouldered shovels and axes to clear four miles of road near Lindsay. On the campus itself, however, freshies, like those in the picture below, are still pretending to be dead horses.

-photos by NORM FISHER ond JOHN SHORE

New U of T college opens today

Students of the Univer- sity of Toronto's new Scar- borough College will have a demonstration today of the latest tool of higher edu- cation— short circuit tele- vision.

Seated in two large lec- ture halls, Scarborough's first freshman class will be officially welcomed by sen- ior administrators of the college, who will appear on television screen rather than in* person.

It is believed this is the 1 rsi freshman class will be it'evision has been the me- dnvn for extending a wel-

come to new students at the opening of a university year.

The opening ceremonies will be held in temporary quarters in the old Biology building on the St. George Campus of the University of Toronto.

Scarborough students will attend classes here, and in the former School of Prac- tical Science building, also known as the little Red Skulehouse.

Completion of the Scar- borough College buildings 21 miles east of downtown Toronto has been delayed.

varsity

TORONTO|^

VOL. 85 NO. 1 SEPT. 20, 1965

Bookstore to offer discounts

The U of T bookstore is giving discounts this year on a limited range of textbooks and on some popular station- ery items.

Book Department Manag- er Herald Bohne said in an interview that the bookstore will offer a discount of 10 per cent on all textbooks in stock priced by the publish- ers at $10 or more.

Discounts on stationery will range from 10 to 20 per cent on such items as clip- boards, three-ring binders, three-ring refills and spiral

notebooks.

In addition there will be a reduction in the price of all Caedmon records. Mr. Bohne said that these re- cords will now be cheaper at the bookstore than any- where else in Toronto.

Mr. Bohne said that all students using the bookstore will receive a newsletter which explains the new dis- count policy and other book- store services such as charge accounts and special orders.

He explained that the newr policy was the result of bud-

geting changes in the book- store operation.

Students in medicine and law will benefit most from the price reductions. Sub- stantial savings will also be passed on to students in en- gineering, chemistrv, phv- sics, mathematics, and biolo- gy- New methods of dealing with the annual rush on the bookstore will also be in- stituted this year.

Charles Fanning, adminis- trative assistant to Mr. Boh- (See Bookstore, page 14)

II of T plans October teach-in

By PAUL CARSON

A faculty-student commit- tee at the University of Tor- onto is organizing an inter- national teach-in to be held on campus the weekend of Oct. 8-10.

U of T President Claude T. Bissell is honorary chair- man of the committee, and Professor Charles Hank of the philosophy departtnen I is chairman.

Other members of the honorary board include

Murray Ross, president of York University, and North- rop Frye, principal of Vic- toria College.

Under the general theme of "Revolution and Res- ponse,' the teach-in will ex- plore the relationship of the major international powers to revolutionary changes in the underdeveloped coun- tries.

A teach-in is a confronta- tion between authorities who hold differing views on various international issues.

CUS to seek abolition of tuition fees

Lennoxville, Que. (CUP) The Canadian Union of Stu- dents has adopted as its first priority "the abolition of all social and financial barriers t o posl-secondary educa- tion."

"Universal accessibility" became the keynote phrase of the 29lh annual CUS Congress held at Bishop's University Aug. 28-Sept. 4.

Delegates from 45 mem- ber institutions adopted the new standing resolution with only one dissenting vote, and decided to seek the abolition of tuition fees

as a first step toward these principles.

To exert public pressure in favor of these goals, the delegates agreed to sponsor a National Student Day to serve as a "manifestation of student opinion," if possible before the federal election

The form of the action to be taken on this day will be decided by each local coun- cil. The manifestions are to be preceded and followed by an education and publici- ty campaign on the prob- lems of higher education. The date will be set by the

During the past summer teach-ins in the United States have been used to promote public debate con- cerning American foreign policy in Viet Nam.

There will be five major sessions, followed by ap- proximately 150 seminars lo- cated in various buildings around the campus.

One of the sessions will be chaired by Patrick Gordon Walker, former British For-

{ See teach-in* page 3 )

national secretariat,

The long-term policy suue- menl, moved by McGill ami Seconded by the University og British Columbia, declar- es "the sole determinant ol the undertaking of post-se- condary education should be academic qualification."

A clause stating "earnings forgone represent a real and serious cost ," created some controversy. In calling for the elimination of this barrier, it was felt that the congress implicitly support-

(See Education, page, 3)

New CUS president is 11 of T graduate

Lennoxville, Que. (CUP ) Douglas Ward 27, was elect- ed president of the Cana- dian Union of Students tor the year 1966-67 at the re- cent CUS congress at Bishop's University.

He defeated Bruce Doern. a former student union pre- sident at the University ul Manitoba, in an u;iev,eintul campaign.

Mr. Ward will office next summer a1 the end ol the term ol current CUs

president Patrick Kenniff. This year, Mr. Ward is as- sistant registrar at the Uni- versity of Toronto.

A divinity graduate (Emm '63), Mr. Ward has been in- ternational affairs secretary ol CUS for die last year, the first nun to hold this position. He is a former president of the University ul Toronto Students Admi- nistrative Council.

In accepting his romina- ( See Ward, page 3 >

DOUG WARD

HART HOUSE g

Jn this column will be onnounced regulor and speciol events occun'ng in Hort House during the academic yeor. All male stu- dents ot the University of Toronto ore members of the House. Make o point, therefore, of watching this column so thot you moy take advantage of the facilities which are yours Jo enjoy.

MUSIC

Among the series of concerts held each yeor by the Music Committee ore the following: SUNDAY EVENING CONCERTS, commencing Oct 3rd with Jon Rubes (Boss) ond Carol Van Feggelen (Guitarist), WEDNESDAY FIVE O'CLOCK RECITALS be- ginning Oct. 13th. with Ron Collier Ql " CONCERTS.

ond NOON HOUR

GLEE CLUB

New members ore required each yeor for this outstanding University Glee Club. Registration will be in the Music Room os follows: Thursday, Sept. 23rd A - 6 p.m., Monday, Sept. 27th 4 - 6 p.m. All members of Hort House both graduate and under- graduote ore welcome and freshmen are especially invited to audi- tion. The ability to read music is on odvontoge but is not essential. Rehearsals take place on Tuesday from 7 - 9.30 p.m. and Thurs- day 5 - 6 p.m.

RECORD ROOMS

One record room houses an excellent clossicol library ond the other a collection of Jazz, Folk-song and spoken word records. A short instructional class must be otlended to enforce proper ond coreful usoge of the equipment. Wotch "The Vorsity" for an- nouncements of times for instruction or the notice boards in the rotundo.

STEINWAY GRAND PIANOS

Any member of Hart House who has ARCT stonding moy use the Steinway Grand pianos after receiving a cord from the Undergraduate Office. There are two upright pianos for use by anyone with lower piano standing.

SQUASH

The Squash Racquets Committee of Hort House controls the bosement. Periods on the squash courts may be reserved one doy prior to ploy by colling the Holl Porter at 928-2452.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR BEGINNERS; Novices interested in Squash instruction should fill in o form on the Freshmon Informa- Boord in the rotundo of Hart House.

LIBRARY

The Library of Hart House, on the second floor, houses about 10,000 volumes for the leisure reading of Hort House members. The Library Committee always appreciates receiving suggestions of new purchases.

HOUSE COMMITTEE DANCE

The first event to be organized by the House Committee will be the Hort House Fall Donee on Saturday, Sept. 25th ot 9 p.m. Tickets $1.00 per person. Available from the Hall Porter.

DEBATES

The Hort House Debates provide a forum for porllamentory debate on questions of public policy. All members ore welcome to ottend and to speak on these occosions. The first debate on October 21 will be on the topic of "Freedom of Speech in Canada".

ALI AKBAR KHAN

MASTER MUSICIAN OF INDIA

and Assisting Artists EATON AUDITORIUM Fri , Oct. 1 ot 8:30 p.m.

Tickets: ':■:.:: 3 - ? Students $1.50

Box Office Opens: Sept. 21

STUDENTS' ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL

STUDENT PARKING FOR 1965-1966

REQUIREMENTS:

Must be outside a fifteen mile radius of the University APPLICATIONS:

Accepted until Friday, Sept. 24, 1965. Permits will be given out Friday, October 1, and no further applications will be accepted. Apply ot S.A.C Office.

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With My l«n* O* Monjcot and J*<qu«f ChorrUf OCTOBER 25, 1965

Students must go home to vote

By ST. BRUNO

More than 2,000 Univer- sity of Toronton students will have to go home to vote in the Nov. 8 federal elect- ion.

Prime Minister Pearson said last Thursday there is not way out of the legal dif- ficulties which will prevent out-of-town students from voting in the ridings which include their universities.

He told Canadian Union of Students president Pat- rick Kenniff that university students who will be away from home could take ad- vantage of the advance poll facilities, although he re- cognized this wouuld not be satisfactory for all.

Because the writs dis- solving Parliament and cal- ling the election were issued Sept. 8, before most univer- sity students were in resi- dence, they will not be on the voters' lists in the uni-

versity ridings.

The CUS has estimated that 20,000 students across the country will be affected. More precise figures are now being gathered from universities.

From last year's enrol- ment figures at U of T it has been estimated that about 2,150 students will be unable to vote in Toronto.

CUS is seeking a legal opinion on the possibility of bypassing the relevant sec- tion of the Canada Elections Act and has said it would fight a court case if legal justification can be found.

Richard Good, CUS vice- president, has suggested that one loophole might in- volve recognizing universi- ties as the permanent re- sidences of the students.

Tom Good (no relation), president of the U of T New Democrats, suggested that if students declare that the university is their norma!

place of residence thej should be included on the voters' lists.

Chief Electoral Officer Nelson Castonguay told CUS that the Elections Act can only be changed by Parlia- ment— and Parliament has been dissolved.

And the Toronto Globe and Mail, in an editorial tit- led "Students, Go Home!", offers the following advice:

"One course of action should surely seem clear to those who have been willing in the past to pilgrimage all the way to Mississippi in support of the voteless Negro minority in the South: whether he has to hitch-hike, bicycle, bust his allowance on plane fare or trundle by Conestoga wa- gon, the most effective way for any student voter to protest a parliamentary sys- tem he disagrees with is to return to his home riding on election day."

Ex-editor to write SUPA report

By VOLKMAR RICHTER

Last year's Varsity editor, Harvey Shepherd, has been hired by the Student Union for Peace Action to write a report on their Fall Train- ing Institute,

SUPA is being paid $4,000 for the report by the Com- pany of Young Canadians Prime Minister Pearson's Peace Corps - style organiza- tion.

The payment in two in- stallments, one before deli- very and one after is being used to pay the travel ex- penses of the delegates to the Institute which was held in a camp north of Montreal two weeks ago.

The delegates, all SUPA volunteers who worked during the summer on var- ious SUPA projects across Canada, gathered in the

camp to evaluate these pro- jects.

A poverty project in King- ston, a study project among the Doukhobors in the . Kootenays, a protest against nuclear arms at the Comox base in British Columbia and another at La Macaza, Que., were included.

SUPA had applied for a travel grant through the Centennial commission to bring . these delegates to- gether, but was refused ap- parently because of the ra- dical character of the organ- ization.

SUPA grew out of the Combined Universities Campaign for Nuclear Dis- armament but has widened its scope into more complete social action work,

SUPA embarrassed the federal government in June when it chose the occasion

of former U.S. represent- ative to the United Nation, Adlai Stevenson's visit to this campus to protest the war in Viet Nam.

When Stewart Goodings, the director of the Company of Young Canadians, heard of the Centennial Commis- sion's refusal to grant SUPA the money, he decided to pay $4,000 for the report on the Institute.

He justified it by saying that SUPA has been doing precisely the type of work the company would attempt to do and a report of its activities would be helpful.

Shepherd, who started working as information of- ficer for the Student Non- Violent Co-ordinating Com- mittee after he left the Var- sity, will be paid $100 to write the report.

building officially open

The new Ramsey Wright Zoological Laboratories, op- ened officially September 18, offer sufficient facilities for teaching and research in zoology for all faculties on campus.

"The laboratories are de- signed with the most for- ward thinking developments of the modern age," said Dr. W.G. Friend, chairman of the zoology planning board.

Laboratory talks and spe- cial instruction will be given over a closed circuit televi- sion system in addition to the regular demonstrators and teaching staff.

Greenhouses and ligut- and-sound-controlled rooms aid the concentrated instruc- tion of zoology in time arid environment change.

Page 2 THE VARSITY, Monday, Sept. 20, 1 965

Ward (continued)

lion, Mr. Ward pointed out that his first priority, uni- versal accessibility to high- er education, seemed "old hat" by the end of the cong- ress, although this had not been so at its start.

Mr. Ward said: "The easy part ( resolutions ) is over. From now on, it's all method and program. We are going back to campuses that may not have been prepared yet.

"I believe in change at the local level, in primary organizations, rather than at secondary levels like this congress," he stressed. "We have to get the students on each campus deliberating on these issues."

"My role is with you in your work, not wheeling and dealing in Ottawa," he

told the delegates from 45 student unions across Ca- nada.

Mr. Ward also set forth his personal belief that "education at all levels is a right which must be pro- vided by society," and said this would only a a begin- ning.

"The implications of uni- versal accessibility to educa- tion start in the pre-school years and in the very fabric of our society," he said. "I hope we will become in- volved in the ordering of our community, in the gov- ernment of the university."

He summed up his ultim- ate goal for CUS as the creation of "a free univer- sity and a relevant univer- sity."

Education (continued)

ed student salaries.

Defending this section, Sharon Sholzberg, president of the McGill students Soci- ety, said that ultimately "university doors will be open to the student even if he hasn't got a penny in his pocket."

A delegate from Waterloo University College, Gary Smith, said rich parents would rather pay directly than have s ky-high i n com e tax.

Miss Sholzberg said that one must consider the ques- tion of accesibility for the student who is independent of his family. The parent should not be forced to play any role in university edu-

cation other than the crea- tion of a home environment conducive to higher learn- ing.

Another CUS resolution, moved by Victoria Universi- ty, stated "after the aboli- tion of tuition fees there is still a discrepancy between annual student revenue and annual student expenditure on education."

It called for modification of existing student loan schemes "as an initial step toward the elimination of loans" by making loans re- fundable upon successful completion of each academic year.

"The congress also adopted a comprehensive 13-point educational action program including socio-economic studies on motivational fac- tors and cybernation.

Teach-in (continued)

eign Secretary.

President B i s s e 1 1 has agreed to chair one of the other sessions.

Topics for the major ses- sions will be Revolution and Ideological Conflict, Latin America, Viet Nam, Revolu- tion and Moral Responsibili- ty, and Problems of Self- Determination.

Spokesman for the teach- in, David Watson, told The Varsity last night that he expects 100,000 people to lis- ten to the proceedings at Convocation Hall by means of a telephone circuit en- compassing about 20 Cana- dian and up to 150 American universities.

The teach-in will be con- ducted in both English and French. A simultaneous translation system will be in use during the major sessions.

Mr. Watson stated that the teach-in will not be fo- cused exclusively on Ameri- can foreign policy, but will discuss the foreign policies of all the great powers. It will concentrate on both basic ideological - economic problems and various spe- cific crises.

In addition to many re- presentatives from Canadian and American universities there will be a number of international speakers and observers.

The committee has so far arranged for speakers from Russia, China, Cambodia, Latin America, and South Viet Nam. Negotiations for a representative from the National Liberation Front, the political arm of the Viet Cong, have been underway for several weeks but no firm statement has been re- leased as yet.

Spokesmen emphasize that the teach-in will not be a "protest" event, but rather will provide neutral ground for an open international forum.

Professor Hanly said that the purpose of the teach-in is "strictly educational". No particular philosophy or na- tional policy will be given any undue advantage, he added.

Total cost of the teach-in is expected to be $35,000 which will be raised by soliciting individuals and educational foundations.

Professor Hanley added that the committee will seek incorporation as a tax-de- ductible educational institu- tion called the International Forum Foundation.

Mr. Watson said that the registration drive for the teach-in will be launched shortly, and that an over- flow crowd is expected.

Additions to the growing list of international speak- ers and observers wilt be announced during the next two weeks.

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THE VARSITY, Monday, September 20, 1965 Page 3

a statement of policy

With this issue. The Varsity begins its ,85th year of publication.

In those 85 years this university has undergone dramatic changes, and amid all this change the student has begun to lose control of his environment. Quality often seems to be sacrificed to quantity at our new mul- tiversity, and the individual becomes a negligible part of the educational process.

The Varsity believes that students hove on important port to play in the life of the university, that they can take an active part in its development. "Too many students ore passive receptors of knowledge; too few realize that they ore oerhaps the basic reason for the university's existence.

The Varsity believes that the traditional apathy of U of T students must be overcome, and that they must play a responsible port in changing the direction of this university. If students fail to act now, they will have no one to blame but themselves if the university becomes oriented toward impersonal efficency rather than humanity.

Our editorial policy will endeavor to encourage responsible student action. Editorials will be unsigned, and will be the opinions of the masthead staff.

old problem, new twist

The discounts on texts and stationery offered by the bookstore this year may be limited, but they ore an in- dication of the store's willingness to pass on savings to students whenever possible.

Unfortunately, the bookstore management's wil- lingness to cooperate with students is being hampered by the students' unwillingness to moke concrete suggestions

Manager Harold Bohne has said that the store is quite prepced to listen to any criticism or improvements put forward by the SAC Bookstore Committee. But the book- store committee foiled to put forward any suggestions this summer in time for their implementation this foil.

The bookstore committee seems to hove died this summer because chairman Dean McDermid (II Dents) was out of town. Perhaps Mr McDermid con be faulted for assuming a position which he could not adequately discharge, but the real blame must be laid at the door of the student population as a whole.

It is ironic that each fall students register loud and anguished complaints about the bookstore operations, yet when o committee is available to deal with these complaints no one can be found to serve on it except a chairman.

Why wos no one else capable of replacing Mr. Mc- Dermid during the summer months, to meet with Mr Bohne and discuss the policies of the bookstore?

Why do students expect their complaints to be listen- ed to when they show themselves to be irresponsible critics incapable of confronting the individuals and the institu- tions of which they complain?

The effort is being made on many North American college campuses to obtain for students a shore in the decision-making processes of the university. At Toronto it seems that first an effort must be mode to stir the students out of their apathy and establish responsible participation in those areas where the administrative of- ticiols hove shown o willingness to cooperate

Varsity

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Page 4 _ THE VARSITY, Monday, September 20, 1965

Machine revolutionizes poetry

Take a peek at this poetry: HONOR

Crimson, divine Apotlinax, opposite willowy fog, be slammed! Breath!

Sunlit, hot honor, the con- sciousness would turn op- posite me by mist.

Provided willowy crying spirit will have risen, chess underneath him is had

round that elegant black beside Diefenbaker, distinctly. Hard dwarves are you past yours.

FLAME You!

Provided she is this sad forest admidst the sharp, pale cold granite

I have been hearing the sunlit flame.

The golden alabster is

While greasy Joan doth keel

the pot.

SIGH

The candelabra does slip You, you and you and you,

and O Whitman Goodbye! Hello!

Who will you be beyond thee and steel and this sad heaven?

based on the principle of relating mathe- matical constructs to the various parts of English grammar. "Feeding" the machine requires only that you push the button.

The button operates a little electronic lube, whose light may stay on or go off ac- cording to a "choice" the computer makes. These on-off combinations within a number system selects from the program the lan- guage concept the machine will use (simple sentence, complex, assertive, interrogative, etc.), and from there on, the progression of number variations accumulates, by trans- lation, a whole range of vocabulary built into the programming data of the machine (but not pre-con trolled by the operator).

Very confusing, to be sure; all I know is that, while I watched, that little light went on or off in a numerical arrangement I could not account for; and by correlating these numbers against the extremely com- plex data chart and series of lists, came up with; "Lawrence falls in fragile Fragilion of Diefenbaker." Which, whatever else it might be, is a sentence one that is likely meaningful to someone who knows who Lawrence is, or who Diefenbaker is, for that matter.

Of course I am not sure that the whole thing is not simply a very clever gag. The suspicion grows when O'Neill tells how he came to build the machine. "In 1961," says he, "the police were preventing poets from reciting in Allan Gardens. I thought the poets needed some support; but since I couldn't write poetry, myself, I decided to build a machine which could." A noble

by ARTHUR ZELDIN

Suppose, just for the sake of conversa- tion, one were to analyze the last poem in this eminently powerful series. Take the "candelabra" as an image of life falling away; the second line applies the message to all mankind, and begins an appeal to the spiritual solace of a great poet. The third line says "goodbye" to life; the fourth, however, contains a recognition that within death, there is rebirth; and the fifth de- velops this trend with a consideration of an after-life beyond the life of individuality, machine-age sterility, and even beyond pre- sent, outmoded concepts of "heaven."

It makes some sort of sense; and the irony of it all is that it was written, not by Cohen, not by Ferlinghetti, or Ginsberg, or any of those boys, but by MR. APOLLINAX, THE POETRY MACHINE. (Poetic license no. 30A60, Ontario, 1953.)

Built by former U of T student Barry O'Neill (who is either very clever, or else has a very good sense of humor probab- ly a bit of both). Mr. Apollinax is a little box, about 24 x 8 x 6 inches, which is actual- ly a miniature computer.

Builder O'Neill has formula ted an extre- mely complicated program for the machine,

idea really; a machine to help break the entrenched forces of establishments.

O'Neill chose the name for the machine from the T. S. Eliot poem, in which "Mr. Apollinax ... is a charming man, but what does he mean?" And O'Neill does call the machine "He", because, as he says, he has progressed to an "I-Thou" relationship with

After all, think of the reverence accorded to the language output of Shakespeare's brain which was really only an elaborate machine. (By the way, literary cognoscenti might recognize, in one line of the above printed poetry ( the machine's own peculiar reverence for fellow ianguagemaker Shakes- peare. Touching.)

"Now," says O'Neill, "all we need is a machine which can read poetry, and we will really be able to save time." A statement which supports my suspicions that the busi- ness is truly a gag. But, while watching that ruddy little light flicking on and off, and seeing the words pile up inexorably on the page before me, dammed if I could figure out what the punch-line was. Or where. Or how.

letter to the editor

new magazine

Sir:

You wi 1 1 ren de r a g rea t service to all East African students studying in your country (and indeed anyone interested in student maga-

zines) by letting them know about the publishing of Dialogue, the first East Af- rican student's magazine.

This magazine aims at be- ing an intellectual medium of communication between East African students for the discussion and study, in

a positive and constructive way,, of all the problems facing East Africa in the next few years.

Wilfred Kiboro, Dialogue, P.O. Box 25090, Nairobi, Kenya.

out of my head

on editorial perspective by david jacket

Bitter experience has shown that when U of T students get together to consider a problem, the solution most often arrived at is the formation of a committee.

Said committee then does little or nothing, quietly fades away, and leaves the problem about where it was before.

The situation is not quite that bad. But no student poli- tician should underestimate the dissatisfaction which most students feel for their elected representatives.

This is a long preamble, the point of which is that last weekend a group of student leaders got together and dis- cussed their mutual problems and didn't form a commit- tee to consider the question in more detail at a later date. The prospects for constructive student action are brighter this year as a result.

This SAC-organized project was dubbed a Conference on Student Affairs, a catch-all title which enabled the par- ticipants to discuss everything from student apathy to fees to the weighty question of what is a university supposed to be.

No one could pretend that answers were found for these problems. But the discussion periods throughout the weekend broke down many of the barriers between stu- dents of differing philosophies and from different areas of the university.

If the conference did nothing else, it at least allowed these student leaders to meet each other, and perhaps pre- pare the groundwork for the communication and co-opera- tion which has in the past been lacking.

A CONSTANT SHIFTING OF FOCUS

The actual progress of the conference was difficult to focus on. Proceedings opened Friday evening with a speech from Doug Ward, former SAC president, president-elect of the Canadian Union of Students, and currently assistant to Robin Ross, U of T's registrar and director of student services. Mr. Ward's remarks were in the nature of a pep- talk, a plea to the student leaders to challenge the people they were leading and change, the bland image which the term "student affairs" has in the past conveyed.

The response to this appeal was a mixed one, despite Mr. Ward's persuasive manner and knowledgeable back- ground. The seminars of the following morning lacked di- rection, and dealt mainly with such large amorphous prob- lems as the legitimacy of student involvement in the uni- versity community and such small specific ones as the means of - enabling the smaller campus organizations to prosper.

It was not until Saturday afternoon, when John Becker spoke to the assembled delegates, that the conference began to take shape.

Mr. Becker is the former undergraduate secretary of Hart House, and is presently registrar of McMaster Univer- sity.

His point of view was expressed by means of such trenchant phrases as "the university is basically an authori- tarian institution" and that "helpful criticism" is the most effective way students can deal with their university Admin- istrations.

Mr. Becker's remarks had the effect of uniting most of those present against him. SAC vice-president David Hunter suggested that what Mr. Becker was desribing was not a community of scholars but a "corporation of scholars."

In the seminars which followed some students began to realize that their share in the university was actually a very small one, and that many administrative officials were quite content with this situation.

TWO CONTRASTING PANELS

The following morning the conference got down to the business of deciding how much student should contribute to the operation of the university. A panel, representing student, staff and administration, opened the discussion with a presentation of three very different points of view.

Irving Abella (SGS). offered the thesis that today's large university has become an industry which fails to take its students seriously. He stated students must be allowed to express their opinions in a democratic fashion on all issues which affect them.

Prof. K. G. McNeill and Robin Ross, representing the staff and the administration respectively, took a somewhat different stand. Both said that student views were neces- sary on non-academic subjects. But Prof. McNeill seemed somewhat surprised by student demands for more formal ways of expressing these opinions. Mr. Ross left the ques- tion open, but did suggest that student participation in the university administration might be desirable in some areas.

At this point the conference died. The Monday panel, involving Canadian University Press president Jim Laxer, and Tom Rahilly (IV Trin), was supposed to deal with stu- dent movements. Unfortunately, Mr. Laxer and Mr. Rahilly, representing the opposite views on the subject, never got to the point, lai-gely because Dr. D. G. Ivey, chairman of the panel and principal of New College, spent much of the time downgrading the very idea of student movements.

The value of the conference lay not in this kind of bick- ering but in the fact that a number of students have now decided they might be wise to get together and do some- thing besides talk, in hopes of making the idea of student participation less of a novelty to the administration

Remodelling & Alterations

A Specialty

STUDENTS' ELITE

CLEANERS & TAILORS 654 Spadino Ave. WA. 2-4361

10% DISCOUNT

ON PRESENTATION of NFCUS cards

P. A. System Operator Wanted

Student wanted to ossist in operation of S.A.C. Public Address System. Preferably 1st year. Remuneration. Apply in writing to:

Business Secretary, S.A.C. Office

THE COLONNADE

COLONNADE DAUBER

men's Hair Stylists Students Rates

Hair Cut 1.50 Styling 3.00

HILLEL

Thursday, September 30, 6:00 p.m., Hiilel House FRESHMAN BUFFET SUPPER Please Call Ihe Hiilel Office (923-7837) immediately for Reservot.c Major Hiilel Lecture: DR. PAUL WEISS Sterling Professor of Philosophy, Vole University Sunday, October 3, 8:30 p.m.. Park Plaxa Hotel

"THE NATURE OF GOD" cond Lecture by Dr. Weiss:

Monday, October 4, 1:00 p.m., U.C., Room 214

"GOD AND THE PHILOSOPHERS"

A Series of Two Lectures on "CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE"

I. Wednesday, October 13, 1:00 p.m., U.C., Room 214 MR. NATHAN COHEN

Theatre Critic and Entertainment Editor of the Toronto Daily Star

"THE WORLD OF ARTHUR MILLER"

II. Wednesday, October 20, 1:00 p.m., U.C., Room 214

DR. PETER BU1TENHUIS

Associate Professor of English, Victoria College

"THE WORLD OF SAUL BELLOW"

HART HOUSE THEATRE

AUDITIONS

ROBERT GILL will hold open Auditions for the first Hart House Theatre Production

HEARTBREAK HOUSE

by GEORGE BERNARD SHAW

WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY AND FRIDAY OF THIS WEEK

2:00 P.M. TO 5:00 P.M.

In Theatre Stage Entrance

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO BOOKSTORES

Three- Locations

i

Hart House

(all books in FRENCH, GERMAN, HISPANIC STUDIES, SLAVIC STUDIES and ITALIAN.)

Front Campus

(all other books and supplies.)

3

Scarborough College

(books and supplies for Scarborough College

Students only. Located temporarily in old Zoology Building.)

HOURS

(effective September 20)

OPEN MONDAY TO THURSDAY 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. to 5 30 p.m. CLOSED FRIDAY EVENINGS

SATURDAY 9.30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. (September 25 and October 2 ONLY)

P.S. If you hate crowds, come in the evenings !

THE VARSITY, Mondoy, September 20, 1965 Page 5

U of T CHORUS

AUDITIONS

7:00 P.M.

TUES. SEPT. 21 MOM. SEPT. 27

EDWARD JOHNSON BUILDING. RM.078 CONDUCTOR: LLOYD BRADSHAW

OVER PAST FEW YEARS THE CHORUS HAS GROWN TO A POSITION OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION.

IT NEEDS AND WELCOMES YOU.

A SAC SPONSORED ACTIVITY

Come up and Play at

EMBASSY

BILLIARDS

LOUNGE

82 BLOOR STREET WEST (Upstairs) Phone 925-3124 For Reservations

15 Brunswick & Gold Crown Multicolored Tables

CATERING BY SOLWAYS NOON HOUR SPECIALS

SPECIAL STUDENTS RATES

LADIES ALWAYS WELCOME

U OF T SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Invites New Members Welcomes Old Members

FIRST REHEARSAL

MM. SEPT. 27 - 7:00 P.M.

REHEARSALS EVERY MONDAY EVENING

EDWARD JOHNSON BUILDING ROOM 078

STRING PLAYERS ESPECIALLY WELCOME

Conductor: TIBOR POLGAR

A SAC SPONSORED ACTIVITY

j

canadian players

$13.50 SERIES TICKETS Siiso

STILL AVAILABLE

SIX PLAYS IN REPERTORY AT CENTRAL LIBRARY THEATRE 20 ST. GEORGE ST. OCTOBER 7 TO MAY 31

MURDER IN THE CATHEDRAL THE FIREBUGS THE PLAY- BOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST THE GLASS MENAGERIE and ONE OTHER PLAY.

Series Tickets Offer Reductions On Box-Office Prices Special Privileges At The New "Players Club" With Hostess Barbara Hamilton.

Phone 927-5280 And Brochure Order Form Will Be Sent To You Immediately

!~5i:;:i~i:!iaiiii!:=:i°

1

HELP WANTED

We need ambitious, witty, intelligent, hard-working, patient, and persevering students to put TORONTONENSIS, the all campus yearbook, on the road. If you fill any or all of the above qualifications, come to Bancroft Hall, third floor (behind the Lash Miller Chemistry Bldg., at the corner of Bancroft and Huron St.), any day at 1 :00.

This year the book is being distributed free. AH students, especially freshmen are welcome to come and work.

SEE YOU AT FRESHMEN WELCOME!

Poge 6 THE VARSITY, Monday, September 20," 1965

Appoint advisor on student problems

Dr. Donald J. McCulloch, Assistant Professor in the University of Toronto Fa- culty of Medicine, has been appointed advisor for stu- dent problems.

Dr. McCulloch is current- ly director of the out-patient clinic at the Ontario Hos- pital on Queen St.

He will offer direct coun- selling to students who are "perplexed and troubled,"